December 7, 2011
Bold energy plan to end reliance on fossil fuels
An energy plan to end Denmark’s reliance on fossil fuels by 2050 and move energy production over to windmills and biomass has been launched by the government.
But while the climate plan might bode well for Denmark’s green credentials and self-sufficient future, in the short term workplaces may be lost.
The plan is likely to be expensive for both tax-payers and businesses, and so to prevent companies from moving jobs to lower cost countries, a fund has been established to help subsidise the switchover.
Under the terms of the plan, 250 million kroner a year will be made available until 2014 after which it will rise to 500 million kroner.
“[The plan] should not have an affect on the number of people employed by Danish businesses,” the climate minister, Martin Lidegaard (Radikale), said at the press conference announcing the plan.
Lidegaard added that the plan is designed to combat the economic crisis, resource crisis and the climate crisis at the same time.
“We want to address all three crises at once. It doesn’t make any sense to solve the economic crisis if that affects the climate crisis and vice versa.”
Lidegaard could not guarantee, however, that some jobs might be lost due to the plan though should a significant number of jobs disappear, the government would reassess its plans. (via Copenhagen Post)

Bold energy plan to end reliance on fossil fuels

An energy plan to end Denmark’s reliance on fossil fuels by 2050 and move energy production over to windmills and biomass has been launched by the government.

But while the climate plan might bode well for Denmark’s green credentials and self-sufficient future, in the short term workplaces may be lost.

The plan is likely to be expensive for both tax-payers and businesses, and so to prevent companies from moving jobs to lower cost countries, a fund has been established to help subsidise the switchover.

Under the terms of the plan, 250 million kroner a year will be made available until 2014 after which it will rise to 500 million kroner.

“[The plan] should not have an affect on the number of people employed by Danish businesses,” the climate minister, Martin Lidegaard (Radikale), said at the press conference announcing the plan.

Lidegaard added that the plan is designed to combat the economic crisis, resource crisis and the climate crisis at the same time.

“We want to address all three crises at once. It doesn’t make any sense to solve the economic crisis if that affects the climate crisis and vice versa.”

Lidegaard could not guarantee, however, that some jobs might be lost due to the plan though should a significant number of jobs disappear, the government would reassess its plans. (via Copenhagen Post)

  1. euralmanac posted this