December 29, 2013
Sweden: School Forced to Close - Was Run Without Permit

13 pupils with special needs have no school to return to after the Christmas break, after their school has been forced to close. It turned out the free school Bohus Helhetsskola in Ljungskile on the west coast, has been running for two years without a permit.

According to Swedish Radio West, a mistake had been made, that neither the school nor the Schools Inspectorate was aware of until now.
Bohus Helhetsskola is one of a small number of schools in Sweden that are not financed by the normal system of public funding. Instead it is funded by fees. But when the school declined the offer of state funding in 2011, it was supposed to apply for a new permit to run a school. That was never done.
"This is a unique situation, I have never seen anythign like it," says Maria Axelsson, head of legal affairs at the Schools Inspectorate, to Swedish Radio News.
But she places the responsibility solely with the school itself. “The principal of the school must know all the laws and rules that apply,” she tells TT.
The school will now have to apply for a new permit. If such a permit is granted, it will still take a year before it can open again, Swedish Radio News reports. (via Radio Sweden)

Sweden: School Forced to Close - Was Run Without Permit

13 pupils with special needs have no school to return to after the Christmas break, after their school has been forced to close. It turned out the free school Bohus Helhetsskola in Ljungskile on the west coast, has been running for two years without a permit.

According to Swedish Radio West, a mistake had been made, that neither the school nor the Schools Inspectorate was aware of until now.

Bohus Helhetsskola is one of a small number of schools in Sweden that are not financed by the normal system of public funding. Instead it is funded by fees. But when the school declined the offer of state funding in 2011, it was supposed to apply for a new permit to run a school. That was never done.

"This is a unique situation, I have never seen anythign like it," says Maria Axelsson, head of legal affairs at the Schools Inspectorate, to Swedish Radio News.

But she places the responsibility solely with the school itself. “The principal of the school must know all the laws and rules that apply,” she tells TT.

The school will now have to apply for a new permit. If such a permit is granted, it will still take a year before it can open again, Swedish Radio News reports. (via Radio Sweden)