February 7, 2014
Florence, Italy
Like a presiding spirit, the cathedral—duomo in Italian—of Santa Maria del Fiore keeps watch over the streetscapes, including this block of Via dei Servi, a few hundred yards northeast of the church. (via National Geographic)

Florence, Italy

Like a presiding spirit, the cathedral—duomo in Italian—of Santa Maria del Fiore keeps watch over the streetscapes, including this block of Via dei Servi, a few hundred yards northeast of the church. (via National Geographic)

December 27, 2013
Italy: Vasari’s Last Supper Reassembled 47 Years After Florence Flood
The last casualty of the devastating Florence flood of 1966 has been reassembled, raising hopes of a full restoration before the 50th anniversary of one of the greatest cultural disasters of modern times.
Giorgio Vasari’s The Last Supper, painted on five wooden panels and measuring about 2.5 metres by 6.5 metres (8ft by 21ft), was one of the most seriously damaged works to survive the flood. Dozens of people and millions of pieces of antiquity and works of art were lost for ever when the Arno burst its banks, raging through Florence in the worst flood since the middle ages. In the decades since, new methods of restoration have been created to help salvage damaged masterpieces.
Vasari’s The Last Supper was completely immersed in water for about 12 hours and the lower portion of the painting was under water for even longer. To help them dry, the waterlogged panels were separated. A paper treatment was applied to the paint itself to stop it from flaking off and being lost permanently.
The work remained in pieces for decades, with restoration experts at a loss to know how it could be put back together. But this week the Los Angeles-based Getty Foundation, which sponsored the reassembly of the painting, announced: “For the first time in 47 years, the five wooden panels that make up the storied painting are joined together again to make the artwork whole”.
The operation, which began more than three years ago, was carried out at the Opificio delle Pietre Dure (OPD) in Florence and co-ordinated by its deputy director of painting conservation, Cecilia Frosinini. “We can now say that the painting has been saved,” she said on Thursday.
Though best known as the author of the first great work of art history – Lives of the Most Excellent Italian Painters, Sculptors, and Architects – Vasari was a noted artist in his own right. The nuns of the Murate Convent in Florence commissioned him to paint a Last Supper in 1546. (via Guardian)

Italy: Vasari’s Last Supper Reassembled 47 Years After Florence Flood

The last casualty of the devastating Florence flood of 1966 has been reassembled, raising hopes of a full restoration before the 50th anniversary of one of the greatest cultural disasters of modern times.

Giorgio Vasari’s The Last Supper, painted on five wooden panels and measuring about 2.5 metres by 6.5 metres (8ft by 21ft), was one of the most seriously damaged works to survive the flood. Dozens of people and millions of pieces of antiquity and works of art were lost for ever when the Arno burst its banks, raging through Florence in the worst flood since the middle ages. In the decades since, new methods of restoration have been created to help salvage damaged masterpieces.

Vasari’s The Last Supper was completely immersed in water for about 12 hours and the lower portion of the painting was under water for even longer. To help them dry, the waterlogged panels were separated. A paper treatment was applied to the paint itself to stop it from flaking off and being lost permanently.

The work remained in pieces for decades, with restoration experts at a loss to know how it could be put back together. But this week the Los Angeles-based Getty Foundation, which sponsored the reassembly of the painting, announced: “For the first time in 47 years, the five wooden panels that make up the storied painting are joined together again to make the artwork whole”.

The operation, which began more than three years ago, was carried out at the Opificio delle Pietre Dure (OPD) in Florence and co-ordinated by its deputy director of painting conservation, Cecilia Frosinini. “We can now say that the painting has been saved,” she said on Thursday.

Though best known as the author of the first great work of art history – Lives of the Most Excellent Italian Painters, Sculptors, and Architects – Vasari was a noted artist in his own right. The nuns of the Murate Convent in Florence commissioned him to paint a Last Supper in 1546. (via Guardian)

March 15, 2012
Florence, Italy
Researchers work on the Battle of Angiari project, a search for the lost Leonardo da Vinci fresco (via guardian.co.uk)

Florence, Italy

Researchers work on the Battle of Angiari project, a search for the lost Leonardo da Vinci fresco (via guardian.co.uk)

December 15, 2011
Liège shooting and grenade attack: previous European incidents in last 10 years
The shootings in the eastern Belgian city of Liege and Florence, Italy, on Tuesday have several precedents over the past 10 years in Europe. (via Telegraph)

Liège shooting and grenade attack: previous European incidents in last 10 years

The shootings in the eastern Belgian city of Liege and Florence, Italy, on Tuesday have several precedents over the past 10 years in Europe. (via Telegraph)

December 14, 2011
Italy: Florence street vendors shot dead by lone gunman
An Italian gunman with fascist sympathies went on a rampage in Florence on Tuesday, killing two African street vendors and wouldning three others in broad daylight before shooting himself dead.
Gianluca Casseri, 50, caused panic when he opened fire on a group of Senegalese street traders at a market in Piazza Dalmazia, on the northern outskirts of the city, killing two men and seriously wounding another.
He then jumped into a white car and drove off. Witnesses said the owner of a newspaper stall tried to block him but the gunman told him that unless he got out of the way he would be the next victim.
Casseri appeared a short time later at San Lorenzo market, in the centre of Florence, where he opened fire again with a large .357 Magnum hand gun, wounding two more Senegalese hawkers.
As dozens of armed police officers closed in, he then drove into an underground car park and turned the gun on himself, shooting himself in the mouth as he sat in his Volkswagen Polo.
Police said Casseri, from the town of Pistoia in Tuscany, had links to a far-Right, anti-immigration movement called Casa Pound. (via Telegraph)

Italy: Florence street vendors shot dead by lone gunman

An Italian gunman with fascist sympathies went on a rampage in Florence on Tuesday, killing two African street vendors and wouldning three others in broad daylight before shooting himself dead.

Gianluca Casseri, 50, caused panic when he opened fire on a group of Senegalese street traders at a market in Piazza Dalmazia, on the northern outskirts of the city, killing two men and seriously wounding another.

He then jumped into a white car and drove off. Witnesses said the owner of a newspaper stall tried to block him but the gunman told him that unless he got out of the way he would be the next victim.

Casseri appeared a short time later at San Lorenzo market, in the centre of Florence, where he opened fire again with a large .357 Magnum hand gun, wounding two more Senegalese hawkers.

As dozens of armed police officers closed in, he then drove into an underground car park and turned the gun on himself, shooting himself in the mouth as he sat in his Volkswagen Polo.

Police said Casseri, from the town of Pistoia in Tuscany, had links to a far-Right, anti-immigration movement called Casa Pound. (via Telegraph)

August 19, 2011
Italy: Tuscan monks ask God to deliver diarrhoea for basilica bible thief
A group of Franciscan monks furious at the theft of bibles from their church in Florence have taken the unusual step of praying for the thief to be struck down by diarrhoea.
Monks at the 15th century church of San Salvatore al Monte, which was a favourite of Michelangelo, were irritated when a rare and expensive bible disappeared from the lectern, and they flew off the handle when a replacement bible donated by a worshipper also went missing and within a few hours. (via The Guardian)

Italy: Tuscan monks ask God to deliver diarrhoea for basilica bible thief

A group of Franciscan monks furious at the theft of bibles from their church in Florence have taken the unusual step of praying for the thief to be struck down by diarrhoea.

Monks at the 15th century church of San Salvatore al Monte, which was a favourite of Michelangelo, were irritated when a rare and expensive bible disappeared from the lectern, and they flew off the handle when a replacement bible donated by a worshipper also went missing and within a few hours. (via The Guardian)

August 8, 2011
Italy: Michelangelo’s San Lorenzo Basilica exterior could be revived
Nearly 500 years after Florence ditched Michelangelo’s grand design for the exterior of San Lorenzo Basilica, the city’s mayor wants to finally realise the artist’s vision (via The Telegraph)

Italy: Michelangelo’s San Lorenzo Basilica exterior could be revived

Nearly 500 years after Florence ditched Michelangelo’s grand design for the exterior of San Lorenzo Basilica, the city’s mayor wants to finally realise the artist’s vision (via The Telegraph)

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