February 24, 2012
London, UK
Prime Minister David Cameron and the Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy visit one of the many construction sites for the cross-London £16 billion Crossrail scheme (via Telegraph)

London, UK

Prime Minister David Cameron and the Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy visit one of the many construction sites for the cross-London £16 billion Crossrail scheme (via Telegraph)

December 23, 2011
Spain names ex-Lehman executive as economy minister
Spain’s new conservative Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy has named his new cabinet after being sworn into office.
Luis de Guindos, a former Lehman Brothers executive, will be economic minister, while Cristobal Montoro was appointed treasury minister.
The new ministers will be required to help steer the country through its toughest economic crisis in decades.
Mr Rajoy’s Popular Party (PP) won polls last month, ousting the Socialist Party amid deep economic gloom.
Mr de Guindos, 51, an economist who headed Lehman Brothers in Spain, was second-in-charge in the ministry between 2002 and 2004 when the PP was last in power.
Working with him in the newly-created post of treasury minister will be Mr Montoro, who has helped draw up the party’s economic policies in opposition over the last seven years.
Mr Montoro was also number two in the economy ministry from 1996 to 2000, and treasury minister from 2000 to 2004. (via BBC News)

Spain names ex-Lehman executive as economy minister

Spain’s new conservative Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy has named his new cabinet after being sworn into office.

Luis de Guindos, a former Lehman Brothers executive, will be economic minister, while Cristobal Montoro was appointed treasury minister.

The new ministers will be required to help steer the country through its toughest economic crisis in decades.

Mr Rajoy’s Popular Party (PP) won polls last month, ousting the Socialist Party amid deep economic gloom.

Mr de Guindos, 51, an economist who headed Lehman Brothers in Spain, was second-in-charge in the ministry between 2002 and 2004 when the PP was last in power.

Working with him in the newly-created post of treasury minister will be Mr Montoro, who has helped draw up the party’s economic policies in opposition over the last seven years.

Mr Montoro was also number two in the economy ministry from 1996 to 2000, and treasury minister from 2000 to 2004. (via BBC News)

December 23, 2011
Madrid, Spain
New Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy is sworn in during a ceremony at the Zarzuela Palace (via Reuters.com)

Madrid, Spain

New Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy is sworn in during a ceremony at the Zarzuela Palace (via Reuters.com)

November 28, 2011
Spanish MP with key role back to work 11 days after giving birth
While most new mothers spend the first few weeks in a state of exhaustion, adjusting to breastfeeding routines and nappies, the government-elect’s rising star is attempting to negotiate an altogether different delivery.
Soraya Saenz Santamaria, a long-time Popular Party spokesman and deputy of Mariano Rajoy has been given the responsibility of overseeing the transferral of powers during the difficult caretaker period as Spain threatens to fall victim to the euro debt crisis before the new government is sworn in mid-December.
But her appointment and decision to forego her right to the mandatory six weeks paid maternity leave has opened debate on the pages of national newspapers and afternoon chat shows in Spain.
She gave birth to her first child, Ivan, on Nov 11 and just a week later appeared in public when she attended the closing campaign rally for the Popular Party in Madrid.
Two days later she was on the balcony of party headquarters celebrating their victory at the polls and the day after at a meeting of top PP members she was seen proudly showing photos of the newborn on her mobile phone.
Her behaviour has refocused debate on the old dilemma of career versus motherhood and drawn both criticism and support. (via Telegraph)

Spanish MP with key role back to work 11 days after giving birth

While most new mothers spend the first few weeks in a state of exhaustion, adjusting to breastfeeding routines and nappies, the government-elect’s rising star is attempting to negotiate an altogether different delivery.

Soraya Saenz Santamaria, a long-time Popular Party spokesman and deputy of Mariano Rajoy has been given the responsibility of overseeing the transferral of powers during the difficult caretaker period as Spain threatens to fall victim to the euro debt crisis before the new government is sworn in mid-December.

But her appointment and decision to forego her right to the mandatory six weeks paid maternity leave has opened debate on the pages of national newspapers and afternoon chat shows in Spain.

She gave birth to her first child, Ivan, on Nov 11 and just a week later appeared in public when she attended the closing campaign rally for the Popular Party in Madrid.

Two days later she was on the balcony of party headquarters celebrating their victory at the polls and the day after at a meeting of top PP members she was seen proudly showing photos of the newborn on her mobile phone.

Her behaviour has refocused debate on the old dilemma of career versus motherhood and drawn both criticism and support. (via Telegraph)

November 21, 2011
Spain’s debt crisis worsens as country begins month of post-election limbo
A landslide victory by Mariano Rajoy’s People’s party (PP) in Sunday’s general election did nothing to stop Spain’s debt problems worsening on Monday as the prime minister elect remained powerless to calm the markets.
Spaniards were proud of having avoided an Italian-style government of unelected technocrats after they gave conservative Rajoy the go-ahead to introduce reform and impose further austerity.
But commentators warned that, similar to the technocrats running Italy and Greece, he had only limited options. “None of his predecessors have accumulated as much power as he will have,” said Jesús Ceberio, a former El País editor. “But, paradoxically, none had such little room for manoeuvre.”
Rajoy is hampered by the country’s system for handing over power, which takes a month, and the impatience of markets that sent the cost of Spanish debt higher on Monday morning. He must also obey the dictates of an EU, dominated by German chancellor Angela Merkel, which has imposed severe austerity programmes on member countries with debt problems. “A large part of his most immediate programme is already set out in the fiscal consolidation plan demanded by Europe,” Ceberio said. (via guardian.co.uk)

Spain’s debt crisis worsens as country begins month of post-election limbo

A landslide victory by Mariano Rajoy’s People’s party (PP) in Sunday’s general election did nothing to stop Spain’s debt problems worsening on Monday as the prime minister elect remained powerless to calm the markets.

Spaniards were proud of having avoided an Italian-style government of unelected technocrats after they gave conservative Rajoy the go-ahead to introduce reform and impose further austerity.

But commentators warned that, similar to the technocrats running Italy and Greece, he had only limited options. “None of his predecessors have accumulated as much power as he will have,” said Jesús Ceberio, a former El País editor. “But, paradoxically, none had such little room for manoeuvre.”

Rajoy is hampered by the country’s system for handing over power, which takes a month, and the impatience of markets that sent the cost of Spanish debt higher on Monday morning. He must also obey the dictates of an EU, dominated by German chancellor Angela Merkel, which has imposed severe austerity programmes on member countries with debt problems. “A large part of his most immediate programme is already set out in the fiscal consolidation plan demanded by Europe,” Ceberio said. (via guardian.co.uk)

November 15, 2011
Valencia, Spain
Aerial view of Valencia’s bullring during a campaign meeting by Spanish Popular party (PP) leader and candidate for the upcoming general elections, Mariano Rajoy. Spain’s right-leaning opposition will thrash the ruling Socialists in November 20 elections, polls show, as anger over an economic crisis spills into the streets. The conservative Popular Party is set for a record parliamentary majority, surveys say. (via Telegraph)

Valencia, Spain

Aerial view of Valencia’s bullring during a campaign meeting by Spanish Popular party (PP) leader and candidate for the upcoming general elections, Mariano Rajoy. Spain’s right-leaning opposition will thrash the ruling Socialists in November 20 elections, polls show, as anger over an economic crisis spills into the streets. The conservative Popular Party is set for a record parliamentary majority, surveys say. (via Telegraph)

November 8, 2011
Madrid, Spain
Alfredo Perez Rubalcaba, candidate for Spain’s ruling Socialists, the PSOE, and Mariano Rajoy, leader of Spain’s centre-right opposition People’s Party (Partido Popular) prepare before a televised debate (via Reuters.com)

Madrid, Spain

Alfredo Perez Rubalcaba, candidate for Spain’s ruling Socialists, the PSOE, and Mariano Rajoy, leader of Spain’s centre-right opposition People’s Party (Partido Popular) prepare before a televised debate (via Reuters.com)

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