February 5, 2014
Madrid, Spain
People carry a shopping cart full of donated items to a food bank (via Guardian)

Madrid, Spain

People carry a shopping cart full of donated items to a food bank (via Guardian)

February 1, 2014
Charles Booth’s 1891 Poverty Map of London
Booth and the survey into life and labour in London (1886-1903) charted boroughs by wealth - the darker the shade, the poorer the area (via Guardian)

Charles Booth’s 1891 Poverty Map of London

Booth and the survey into life and labour in London (1886-1903) charted boroughs by wealth - the darker the shade, the poorer the area (via Guardian)

December 31, 2013
Extreme Poverty Rises in Greece
A study conducted by Athens University of Economics and Business along with the Associate Professor of the University, Manos Matsaganis, showed that the percentage of Greeks that live in poverty has increased significantly. Some 14 percent of the Greek population lives in poverty for the year 2013, whereas in 2009 the percentage of those who lived in poverty was 2 percent of the country’s population.
Victims of this situation amount to 630,000 people who are unemployed and some 455,000 Greek households in which none of their members have a job. The survey suggests that this situation of extreme poverty was not only a result of the deep and constant recession.  The lack in an effective social mechanism that would protect and support those who have a low-income is another important and determining factor that led in the outburst of poverty in Greece. (via Greek Reporter)

Extreme Poverty Rises in Greece

A study conducted by Athens University of Economics and Business along with the Associate Professor of the University, Manos Matsaganis, showed that the percentage of Greeks that live in poverty has increased significantly. Some 14 percent of the Greek population lives in poverty for the year 2013, whereas in 2009 the percentage of those who lived in poverty was 2 percent of the country’s population.

Victims of this situation amount to 630,000 people who are unemployed and some 455,000 Greek households in which none of their members have a job. The survey suggests that this situation of extreme poverty was not only a result of the deep and constant recession.  The lack in an effective social mechanism that would protect and support those who have a low-income is another important and determining factor that led in the outburst of poverty in Greece. (via Greek Reporter)

December 27, 2013
Greek Families Ask Samaras and Papoulias to Adopt their Children
Several families that are a three-child household from a region in central Greece, Almyros, made a symbolic move, indicative of their desperation. They asked the Greek Prime Minister, Antonis Samaras, the President of Greek Republic, Karolos Papoulias, as well as the President of Greek Parliament to adopt their children as they cannot afford to raise them on their own.
Many families in Greece have suffered painful cuts in salaries; their members are jobless, while the State has reduced the grants to multi-child families. All these strict measures have affected all Greek families and namely multiple children households as they cannot make ends meet and are unable to cover even the basic needs of their children.
According to the local newspaper Taxidromos, there were 40 applications with which the parents called the President of Greek Republic, the President of Greek Parliament and the Greek Prime Minister to adopt their children. All these applications were sent on Monday, by the Almyros’ Association of three-child families. Those three political leaders were asked to adopt a total of 120 children from Almyros. (via Greek Reporter)

Greek Families Ask Samaras and Papoulias to Adopt their Children

Several families that are a three-child household from a region in central Greece, Almyros, made a symbolic move, indicative of their desperation. They asked the Greek Prime Minister, Antonis Samaras, the President of Greek Republic, Karolos Papoulias, as well as the President of Greek Parliament to adopt their children as they cannot afford to raise them on their own.

Many families in Greece have suffered painful cuts in salaries; their members are jobless, while the State has reduced the grants to multi-child families. All these strict measures have affected all Greek families and namely multiple children households as they cannot make ends meet and are unable to cover even the basic needs of their children.

According to the local newspaper Taxidromos, there were 40 applications with which the parents called the President of Greek Republic, the President of Greek Parliament and the Greek Prime Minister to adopt their children. All these applications were sent on Monday, by the Almyros’ Association of three-child families. Those three political leaders were asked to adopt a total of 120 children from Almyros. (via Greek Reporter)

December 2, 2012
Greeks turn to the forests for fuel as winter nears
After first felling society’s most vulnerable, with pensioners and low-income workers at the fore, debt-stricken Greece’s great economic crisis is now destroying the middle class. The announcement this week that €44bn in emergency aid will soon be funnelled into the country – the latest in a series of rescue programmes by the EU and IMF to prop up an economy running on empty – comes as little consolation for people on the ground.
Poised for their worst winter since the eruption of the crisis three years ago, Greeks who once thought nothing of heating their homes now hesitate. After relentless waves of austerity and tax rises that have seen their purchasing power drop by up to 50%, even doctors and lawyers are feeling the pinch, with many saying they cannot afford the 40% surcharge the government has slapped on heating oil.
Having been on the frontline of Europe’s debt drama from the outset, Greece embraced austerity in return for international financial assistance that has kept bankruptcy at bay and tied it to the family of single currency nations. But the effect has been ever more devastating on its social fabric. Middle class downsizing is the latest tell-tale sign in a country whose GDP officials predict will shrink 25% by 2014 – a contraction unheard of in an advanced western economy since America’s Great Depression. (via The Guardian)

Greeks turn to the forests for fuel as winter nears

After first felling society’s most vulnerable, with pensioners and low-income workers at the fore, debt-stricken Greece’s great economic crisis is now destroying the middle class. The announcement this week that €44bn in emergency aid will soon be funnelled into the country – the latest in a series of rescue programmes by the EU and IMF to prop up an economy running on empty – comes as little consolation for people on the ground.

Poised for their worst winter since the eruption of the crisis three years ago, Greeks who once thought nothing of heating their homes now hesitate. After relentless waves of austerity and tax rises that have seen their purchasing power drop by up to 50%, even doctors and lawyers are feeling the pinch, with many saying they cannot afford the 40% surcharge the government has slapped on heating oil.

Having been on the frontline of Europe’s debt drama from the outset, Greece embraced austerity in return for international financial assistance that has kept bankruptcy at bay and tied it to the family of single currency nations. But the effect has been ever more devastating on its social fabric. Middle class downsizing is the latest tell-tale sign in a country whose GDP officials predict will shrink 25% by 2014 – a contraction unheard of in an advanced western economy since America’s Great Depression. (via The Guardian)

October 20, 2012
Greek poverty so bad families 'can no longer afford to bury their dead'

Greek demonstrations are not now marked by the vehemence or violence of the mass protests that occurred when Europe’s debt drama erupted in Athens, forcing the then socialist government to announce pay and pension cuts, tax increases and benefit losses that few had anticipated. Anger and bewilderment have been replaced by disappointment and despair.

But the quiet fortitude that has been on display could soon run out in the country on the frontline of the continent’s worst crisis since the second world war. For on Thursday demonstrators were sure of one thing: if pushed too far they may be pushed over the edge.

"Personally, I’m amazed there hasn’t been a revolution," said Panaghiotis Varotsos, a computer programmer.

"In Portugal they’re rioting over one measure when here we’ve been made to accept countless cuts and tax increases. And the worst thing about being ground down is that it breeds extremism," said the silver-haired leftist. "In the case of Greece it is extremism that is going to the right because [the neo-Nazi party] Golden Dawn has managed to exploit people’s despair. But it won’t just stay here. It will spread, like this economic crisis, to other parts of Europe, too."

For the vast majority of those who took to the streets, the tipping point could be the latest round of austerity measures being demanded of the debt-stricken country in return for the international rescue funds it so desperately needs to keep bankruptcy at bay.

Under intense pressure from international creditors at the EU and IMF, Samaras’ fragile coalition has been forced to draw up a draconian package of spending cuts worth €13.5bn – the price of a whopping €31.5bn loan instalment that is already four months overdue. Officials have suggested the burden will fall on society’s most vulnerable with pensioners and low-income Greeks once again having to make the biggest sacrifices. (via guardian.co.uk)

October 20, 2012
French Officials Work to Stem Drug Wars in Marseille
Drug and gang violence in Marseille, France’s second-largest city, has gotten so out of control that one local politician has called for the army to be sent in to restore order.
Marseille is France’s oldest city, and its poorest. A quarter of the population lives below the poverty line, and 18 percent are without jobs. In some parts of the city, youth unemployment is as high as 50 percent. Youth crime is soaring, too.
"Right now in Marseille, it is like Chicago in 1930; gangs, violence, drugs," said businessman Mohamed Ziani grew up in the Mediterranean port city and has watched it change. At the crossroads of trade, from Italy to the east and Spain to the west, much of the drug traffic in Europe comes through Marseille.
Today, drugs are dealt openly in many of the high-rise housing developments that dot the city. And guns are cheap, raising rivalries to a deadly level. This year, 21 people have been killed in a brutal drug-trade turf war. (via VOA_News)

French Officials Work to Stem Drug Wars in Marseille

Drug and gang violence in Marseille, France’s second-largest city, has gotten so out of control that one local politician has called for the army to be sent in to restore order.

Marseille is France’s oldest city, and its poorest. A quarter of the population lives below the poverty line, and 18 percent are without jobs. In some parts of the city, youth unemployment is as high as 50 percent. Youth crime is soaring, too.

"Right now in Marseille, it is like Chicago in 1930; gangs, violence, drugs," said businessman Mohamed Ziani grew up in the Mediterranean port city and has watched it change. At the crossroads of trade, from Italy to the east and Spain to the west, much of the drug traffic in Europe comes through Marseille.

Today, drugs are dealt openly in many of the high-rise housing developments that dot the city. And guns are cheap, raising rivalries to a deadly level. This year, 21 people have been killed in a brutal drug-trade turf war. (via VOA_News)

March 1, 2012
Hungarian village helps itself out of poverty

aj-rromale:

(Reuters) - Rozsaly, near the border with Romania and Ukraine in one of the country’s poorest regions, pays local workers to grow crops and raise livestock to help the village feed itself and ease the poverty that has affected it for generations.

Last year, it was also among the first places in which the Hungarian government introduced its new public works scheme, which aims to help hundreds of thousands of mostly unskilled people back into the labour market.

Continue reading ►

(source: Than, Krisztina. “Hungarian Village Helps Itself out of Poverty.” Reuters. 27 Feb. 2012. Web. http://in.reuters.com/article/2012/02/27/hungary-poverty-idINDEE81Q0GK20120227)

January 9, 2012
Around 100 street beggars remain in Finland
Around 100 street beggars from Romania and Bulgaria have remained in Finland for the winter. They have found shelter in overcrowded one-room apartments and on the streets as no new camp has been constructed. The National Bureau of investigation says some of the Romania Roma may be here against their will. However, claims of human trafficking are not being followed up as the Roma remain tight lipped.
Those working among the Romanian roma say that most of them stay overnight in small apartments housing dozens of people. In Vantaa, one person has given shelter to around ten people.
Each of them presents harrowing tales of difficult and poor conditions back home, and of their poor state of health. Thanks to the Helsinki Deaconess Institute, they are able to receive medical attention. At a day centre in the Sörnäinen district of Helsinki, the street beggars can wash, cook and rest.
All say they beg money to help their children back home. It has cost them between 150 and 300 euros to get to Finland, they claim.
According to the National Board of Investigation (NBI), over ten people were convicted in Romania for human trafficking last year. They had brought people to Finland and forced them to beg, play in the street, steal or work on building sites for low wages. The NBI took part in the investigations.
Since last summer, investigations have not continued. Romanian’s living in Helsinki say they have not heard of cases of human trafficking. (via YLE Uutiset)

Around 100 street beggars remain in Finland

Around 100 street beggars from Romania and Bulgaria have remained in Finland for the winter. They have found shelter in overcrowded one-room apartments and on the streets as no new camp has been constructed. The National Bureau of investigation says some of the Romania Roma may be here against their will. However, claims of human trafficking are not being followed up as the Roma remain tight lipped.

Those working among the Romanian roma say that most of them stay overnight in small apartments housing dozens of people. In Vantaa, one person has given shelter to around ten people.

Each of them presents harrowing tales of difficult and poor conditions back home, and of their poor state of health. Thanks to the Helsinki Deaconess Institute, they are able to receive medical attention. At a day centre in the Sörnäinen district of Helsinki, the street beggars can wash, cook and rest.

All say they beg money to help their children back home. It has cost them between 150 and 300 euros to get to Finland, they claim.

According to the National Board of Investigation (NBI), over ten people were convicted in Romania for human trafficking last year. They had brought people to Finland and forced them to beg, play in the street, steal or work on building sites for low wages. The NBI took part in the investigations.

Since last summer, investigations have not continued. Romanian’s living in Helsinki say they have not heard of cases of human trafficking. (via YLE Uutiset)

January 3, 2012
Greek economic crisis turns tragic for children abandoned by their families
From cases of newborn babies wrapped in swaddling and dumped on the doorsteps of clinics, to children being offloaded on charities and put in foster care, the nation’s struggle to pay off its debts is assuming dramatic proportions, even if officials insist that the belt-tightening and structural reforms will eventually change the EU’s most uncompetitive economy for the better.
Propelled by poverty, 500 families had recently asked to place children in homes run by the charity SOS Children’s Villages, according to the Greek daily Kathimerini. One toddler was left at the nursery she attended with a note that read: “I will not return to get Anna. I don’t have any money, I can’t bring her up. Sorry. Her mother.”
"Unfortunately, there’s been a huge increase in demand from families in need," said Dimitris Tzouras, a social worker employed with the organisation for 19 years. "In the greater Attica region [of Athens], we’re talking about a 100% increase partly because public welfare is in such disarray people have no one else to turn to."
Whereas in the past, pleas for help had come mostly from families where abuse was a problem, they are now from victims of the economic crisis.
"Parents who feel they can no longer look after children are calling in, but our policy is to do whatever we can to keep families united," added Tzouras. "The crisis has exacerbated underlying problems that in the past may just have threatened to tear families apart. It’s not only the vulnerable. It’s now affecting the middle class." (via The Guardian)

Greek economic crisis turns tragic for children abandoned by their families

From cases of newborn babies wrapped in swaddling and dumped on the doorsteps of clinics, to children being offloaded on charities and put in foster care, the nation’s struggle to pay off its debts is assuming dramatic proportions, even if officials insist that the belt-tightening and structural reforms will eventually change the EU’s most uncompetitive economy for the better.

Propelled by poverty, 500 families had recently asked to place children in homes run by the charity SOS Children’s Villages, according to the Greek daily Kathimerini. One toddler was left at the nursery she attended with a note that read: “I will not return to get Anna. I don’t have any money, I can’t bring her up. Sorry. Her mother.”

"Unfortunately, there’s been a huge increase in demand from families in need," said Dimitris Tzouras, a social worker employed with the organisation for 19 years. "In the greater Attica region [of Athens], we’re talking about a 100% increase partly because public welfare is in such disarray people have no one else to turn to."

Whereas in the past, pleas for help had come mostly from families where abuse was a problem, they are now from victims of the economic crisis.

"Parents who feel they can no longer look after children are calling in, but our policy is to do whatever we can to keep families united," added Tzouras. "The crisis has exacerbated underlying problems that in the past may just have threatened to tear families apart. It’s not only the vulnerable. It’s now affecting the middle class." (via The Guardian)

Liked posts on Tumblr: More liked posts »