January 11, 2014
villesdeurope:

Prague, Czech Republic

villesdeurope:

Prague, Czech Republic

December 25, 2013
westeastsouthnorth:

Prague, Czech Republic

westeastsouthnorth:

Prague, Czech Republic

(Source: Flickr / pentlandpirate, via coffee-in-europe)

March 19, 2012
Prague, Czech Republic
A model at a fashion show called ‘Hell’ during the Holešovice Fashion Market (via guardian.co.uk)

Prague, Czech Republic

A model at a fashion show called ‘Hell’ during the Holešovice Fashion Market (via guardian.co.uk)

February 5, 2012
Prague, Czech Republic
A young couple skate on a frozen pond (via guardian.co.uk)

Prague, Czech Republic

A young couple skate on a frozen pond (via guardian.co.uk)

February 3, 2012
Prague, Czech Republic
A homeless woman sits in an abandoned factory which serves as a shelter for homeless people in the city’s Vysocany district (via Reuters.com)

Prague, Czech Republic

A homeless woman sits in an abandoned factory which serves as a shelter for homeless people in the city’s Vysocany district (via Reuters.com)

February 3, 2012
Prague, Czech Republic
Homeless people brave low temperatures as they sleep under a bridge with a huge icicle hanging off it, in the Liben district. More than 60 people have died in a cold snap across Eastern Europe. (via Telegraph)

Prague, Czech Republic

Homeless people brave low temperatures as they sleep under a bridge with a huge icicle hanging off it, in the Liben district. More than 60 people have died in a cold snap across Eastern Europe. (via Telegraph)

February 2, 2012
Prague, Czech Republic
A woman is reflected in a broken mirror at a shelter for homeless people (via guardian.co.uk)

Prague, Czech Republic

A woman is reflected in a broken mirror at a shelter for homeless people (via guardian.co.uk)

January 30, 2012
Europe’s Jewish heritage gets online home
Jewish Heritage Europe is a project of the Rothschild Foundation (Hanadiv) Europe and aims to serve as an online clearinghouse for all news, information and contacts about Jewish heritage from as far east as Turkey and Russia to the UK and Portugal. The focus will be on built Jewish heritage, meaning synagogues, cemeteries and other architectural remnants of Jewish culture that attest to a presence on the continent stretching back to Antiquity.
The project’s launch was held in Prague on the first night of Hanukkah 2011. Ruth Ellen Gruber, who heads the site, told Czech Position that Prague was selected for a very particular reason.
“One of the reasons we wanted to launch it in Prague was that the Czech Republic has had such success in handling of its Jewish heritage sites. They have models I think that could be followed,” Gruber said. “They developed a strategy very early on of what to do with the buildings they received back, how to work in partnerships with local civic initiatives, how to fundraise, and so on.”
Gruber maintains that there were many factors that contributed to the strong results of Czech Jewish organizations in protecting its heritage, including the positive climate in the country and the significant experience already gained by researchers in the Jewish Museum.
Covering 48 different European countries from the largest to territories such as Andorra and Vatican City, Gruber sees vast differences in results among them. “They [Czech Republic] really devised a strategy that in many other countries unfortunately hasn’t been realized.”
One of the key obstacles in protecting and acknowledging Jewish heritage sites in Europe was the existence of communist regimes that suppressed Jewish culture altogether. Gruber notes that more Czech and Slovak synagogues were destroyed during communism than during German occupation in World War II. Beyond that, the few people who attempted to research the remaining sites were not only discourage from doing so but became the focus of suspicion as they tried to photograph abandoned synagogues and overgrown cemeteries. (via Czech Position)

Europe’s Jewish heritage gets online home

Jewish Heritage Europe is a project of the Rothschild Foundation (Hanadiv) Europe and aims to serve as an online clearinghouse for all news, information and contacts about Jewish heritage from as far east as Turkey and Russia to the UK and Portugal. The focus will be on built Jewish heritage, meaning synagogues, cemeteries and other architectural remnants of Jewish culture that attest to a presence on the continent stretching back to Antiquity.

The project’s launch was held in Prague on the first night of Hanukkah 2011. Ruth Ellen Gruber, who heads the site, told Czech Position that Prague was selected for a very particular reason.

“One of the reasons we wanted to launch it in Prague was that the Czech Republic has had such success in handling of its Jewish heritage sites. They have models I think that could be followed,” Gruber said. “They developed a strategy very early on of what to do with the buildings they received back, how to work in partnerships with local civic initiatives, how to fundraise, and so on.”

Gruber maintains that there were many factors that contributed to the strong results of Czech Jewish organizations in protecting its heritage, including the positive climate in the country and the significant experience already gained by researchers in the Jewish Museum.

Covering 48 different European countries from the largest to territories such as Andorra and Vatican City, Gruber sees vast differences in results among them. “They [Czech Republic] really devised a strategy that in many other countries unfortunately hasn’t been realized.”

One of the key obstacles in protecting and acknowledging Jewish heritage sites in Europe was the existence of communist regimes that suppressed Jewish culture altogether. Gruber notes that more Czech and Slovak synagogues were destroyed during communism than during German occupation in World War II. Beyond that, the few people who attempted to research the remaining sites were not only discourage from doing so but became the focus of suspicion as they tried to photograph abandoned synagogues and overgrown cemeteries. (via Czech Position)

January 14, 2012
Prague, Czech Republic
Workers prepare to remove a wooden sculptural decoration from the Astronomical Clock at the Old Town Square (via Telegraph)

Prague, Czech Republic

Workers prepare to remove a wooden sculptural decoration from the Astronomical Clock at the Old Town Square (via Telegraph)

January 13, 2012
Museum devoted to king of Czech comics opens
The artistic style is unmistakable to Czech eyes: cowboys, aliens, machine gun-toting gangsters, stylish super cars and an abundance of scantily-clad, big-breasted women. With the opening of Kája Saudek Comics Museum off of Prague’s Wenceslas Square, the artist’s work will gain the increased international exposure that communist censorship and post-1989 commercialization prevented him from attaining.
“The museum is the first step of our initiative to introduce Saudek to a wider audience,” the artist’s daughter, Berenika Saudková, told Czech Position, adding that it will also serve as a litmus test for Saudek’s international reception.
“I believe he will be received in other countries as positively as he has been at home where the comic genre has never been considered art.”
The idea for the museum arose after Saudková decorated the interior of the rock club Batalion entirely in her father’s comic style. Three years later the museum has opened containing over 90 artworks as well as photographs of the artist.
The 76-year-old twin brother of internationally celebrated Czech photographer Jan Saudek, Karel ‘Kája’ Saudek’s aesthetic shows the powerful influence of American comics. Far from being mere adulation or imitation, though, Saudek injects more than his fair share of satirical wit into the images of muscular heroes and buxom babes. One of the funniest panels exhibited in the museum is a mock back-page comic advertisement which says, “If you read this motto you win!” (via Czech Position)

Museum devoted to king of Czech comics opens

The artistic style is unmistakable to Czech eyes: cowboys, aliens, machine gun-toting gangsters, stylish super cars and an abundance of scantily-clad, big-breasted women. With the opening of Kája Saudek Comics Museum off of Prague’s Wenceslas Square, the artist’s work will gain the increased international exposure that communist censorship and post-1989 commercialization prevented him from attaining.

“The museum is the first step of our initiative to introduce Saudek to a wider audience,” the artist’s daughter, Berenika Saudková, told Czech Position, adding that it will also serve as a litmus test for Saudek’s international reception.

“I believe he will be received in other countries as positively as he has been at home where the comic genre has never been considered art.”

The idea for the museum arose after Saudková decorated the interior of the rock club Batalion entirely in her father’s comic style. Three years later the museum has opened containing over 90 artworks as well as photographs of the artist.

The 76-year-old twin brother of internationally celebrated Czech photographer Jan Saudek, Karel ‘Kája’ Saudek’s aesthetic shows the powerful influence of American comics. Far from being mere adulation or imitation, though, Saudek injects more than his fair share of satirical wit into the images of muscular heroes and buxom babes. One of the funniest panels exhibited in the museum is a mock back-page comic advertisement which says, “If you read this motto you win!” (via Czech Position)

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