March 10, 2012
Lithuania: Reform with a Bulldozer 
France‘s move to bust up Roma encampments and send their inhabitants packing caused an outcry across Europe in 2010. But in Vilnius, officials have been demolishing a decades-old Roma community with barely a whisper of condemnation beyond the country‘s borders.
City Hall says the destruction is part of an effort to clean up the neighborhood and stem drug trafficking. Critics say it’s a ploy by the city’s flamboyant mayor to win support for his fledgling political party before parliamentary elections in the fall.
In mid-February, Mayor Arturas Zuokas ordered the demolition of three illegally built houses in a Roma settlement and has targeted another 19. The settlement, one of two in the city’s Kirtimai neighborhood, houses nearly 200 people in some 20 plank-and-cardboard shacks. Nearly everyone there is unemployed.
The only public service the community receives is electricity, which comes from dangerously dangling illegal cables.
Inside the shacks, though, are surprising signs of affluence, including new televisions and tablet computers set atop wobbly tables. Parked along the muddy roads leading into the settlement are several new Mercedes.
In 2008, the city’s planning and construction department ruled that the houses there were built illegally and should come down.
“The municipality will do everything in order not to have the Roma settlement on the Vilnius map any longer. The Roma themselves agree that the conditions they live in are very adverse to rearing children,” Zuokas said in a statement after the demolitions.
The settlement, near the city‘s airport, has become a notorious drug market, but officials are determined to transform the area into an economic development zone, with the opening of an IKEA store this year as the starting point. (via Transitions Online)

Lithuania: Reform with a Bulldozer

France‘s move to bust up Roma encampments and send their inhabitants packing caused an outcry across Europe in 2010. But in Vilnius, officials have been demolishing a decades-old Roma community with barely a whisper of condemnation beyond the country‘s borders.

City Hall says the destruction is part of an effort to clean up the neighborhood and stem drug trafficking. Critics say it’s a ploy by the city’s flamboyant mayor to win support for his fledgling political party before parliamentary elections in the fall.

In mid-February, Mayor Arturas Zuokas ordered the demolition of three illegally built houses in a Roma settlement and has targeted another 19. The settlement, one of two in the city’s Kirtimai neighborhood, houses nearly 200 people in some 20 plank-and-cardboard shacks. Nearly everyone there is unemployed.

The only public service the community receives is electricity, which comes from dangerously dangling illegal cables.

Inside the shacks, though, are surprising signs of affluence, including new televisions and tablet computers set atop wobbly tables. Parked along the muddy roads leading into the settlement are several new Mercedes.

In 2008, the city’s planning and construction department ruled that the houses there were built illegally and should come down.

“The municipality will do everything in order not to have the Roma settlement on the Vilnius map any longer. The Roma themselves agree that the conditions they live in are very adverse to rearing children,” Zuokas said in a statement after the demolitions.

The settlement, near the city‘s airport, has become a notorious drug market, but officials are determined to transform the area into an economic development zone, with the opening of an IKEA store this year as the starting point. (via Transitions Online)

March 6, 2012
Germany: meet the migrants in Duisburg-Hochfeld 
In the German city of Duisburg, the suburb of Hochfeld is known for its vibrancy. It’s home to people from 100 different nations. But with the recent influx of eastern European migrants, the community has changed. (via DW.DE)

Germany: meet the migrants in Duisburg-Hochfeld

In the German city of Duisburg, the suburb of Hochfeld is known for its vibrancy. It’s home to people from 100 different nations. But with the recent influx of eastern European migrants, the community has changed. (via DW.DE)

March 2, 2012
Hate Has No Home In Hungary
On February 23 it was exactly three years to the day that Robert Csorba and his five-year-old son Robert Csorba Jr. lost their lives in Tatárszentgyörgy. Their brutal murder was part of a spree of violent hate crimes against the Roma that swept across Hungary in 2008-2009.
Over 150 memorial services were held, not only in Hungary but all across Europe as Roma and non-Roma remembered the tragic victims. In Matyas ter, in the 8th district of Budapest, about 400 people gathered to pay their respects. Songs were sung, poems and speeches were emotionally delivered as the crowd laid candles and flowers in a touching tribute. (via ROMEDIA FOUNDATION)

Hate Has No Home In Hungary

On February 23 it was exactly three years to the day that Robert Csorba and his five-year-old son Robert Csorba Jr. lost their lives in Tatárszentgyörgy. Their brutal murder was part of a spree of violent hate crimes against the Roma that swept across Hungary in 2008-2009.

Over 150 memorial services were held, not only in Hungary but all across Europe as Roma and non-Roma remembered the tragic victims. In Matyas ter, in the 8th district of Budapest, about 400 people gathered to pay their respects. Songs were sung, poems and speeches were emotionally delivered as the crowd laid candles and flowers in a touching tribute. (via ROMEDIA FOUNDATION)

February 6, 2012
PhotoMythology - Romani Gypsies

golden-zephyr:

This series of photographs and  images are a visual  story of the Romani  I have known and their struggle to maintain Tradition in the face of Modernity and ongoing racism and persecution. HIghlighting children from California to the Camp lands of Italy and France,  these images represent over twenty five years of our relationship. My intention has been to see beyond the stereotype of “Gypsy” which limits our understanding of the Roma.



(via golden-zephyr-deactivated201401)

February 4, 2012
Skopje, Macedonia
A Romany child stands in front of the family’s makeshift home, which is an old, discarded factory (via Reuters.com)

Skopje, Macedonia

A Romany child stands in front of the family’s makeshift home, which is an old, discarded factory (via Reuters.com)

January 28, 2012

Hungary’s Roma clash with far-right paramilitary group - video

In 2011, members of a uniformed and armed rightwing paramilitary group moved into Gyöngyöspata, a small Hungarian village, ostensibly as a ‘neighbourhood watch patrol’. The village’s 450 Roma claim the real motive was to terrorise and drive out their community. The Hungarian Civil Liberties Union filmed the rise of the far-right Jobbik party, the group’s political wing (via guardian.co.uk)

January 9, 2012
Around 100 street beggars remain in Finland
Around 100 street beggars from Romania and Bulgaria have remained in Finland for the winter. They have found shelter in overcrowded one-room apartments and on the streets as no new camp has been constructed. The National Bureau of investigation says some of the Romania Roma may be here against their will. However, claims of human trafficking are not being followed up as the Roma remain tight lipped.
Those working among the Romanian roma say that most of them stay overnight in small apartments housing dozens of people. In Vantaa, one person has given shelter to around ten people.
Each of them presents harrowing tales of difficult and poor conditions back home, and of their poor state of health. Thanks to the Helsinki Deaconess Institute, they are able to receive medical attention. At a day centre in the Sörnäinen district of Helsinki, the street beggars can wash, cook and rest.
All say they beg money to help their children back home. It has cost them between 150 and 300 euros to get to Finland, they claim.
According to the National Board of Investigation (NBI), over ten people were convicted in Romania for human trafficking last year. They had brought people to Finland and forced them to beg, play in the street, steal or work on building sites for low wages. The NBI took part in the investigations.
Since last summer, investigations have not continued. Romanian’s living in Helsinki say they have not heard of cases of human trafficking. (via YLE Uutiset)

Around 100 street beggars remain in Finland

Around 100 street beggars from Romania and Bulgaria have remained in Finland for the winter. They have found shelter in overcrowded one-room apartments and on the streets as no new camp has been constructed. The National Bureau of investigation says some of the Romania Roma may be here against their will. However, claims of human trafficking are not being followed up as the Roma remain tight lipped.

Those working among the Romanian roma say that most of them stay overnight in small apartments housing dozens of people. In Vantaa, one person has given shelter to around ten people.

Each of them presents harrowing tales of difficult and poor conditions back home, and of their poor state of health. Thanks to the Helsinki Deaconess Institute, they are able to receive medical attention. At a day centre in the Sörnäinen district of Helsinki, the street beggars can wash, cook and rest.

All say they beg money to help their children back home. It has cost them between 150 and 300 euros to get to Finland, they claim.

According to the National Board of Investigation (NBI), over ten people were convicted in Romania for human trafficking last year. They had brought people to Finland and forced them to beg, play in the street, steal or work on building sites for low wages. The NBI took part in the investigations.

Since last summer, investigations have not continued. Romanian’s living in Helsinki say they have not heard of cases of human trafficking. (via YLE Uutiset)

January 8, 2012
March commemorates young Romany shot dead in Czech town
About 200 people attended today´s funeral of a young Romany man who was shot dead in Tanvald a week ago, and a following march in his commemoration, which ended without any incidents in the afternoon.
After a requiem mass in the local church, accompanied by strong emotions, the crowd followed the coffin on its way to the Tanvald cemetery, from which most participants set off for the place where the 22-year-old man died to observe a minute of silence and lit candles.
Police officers, including an anti-conflict team, monitored the funeral’s course.
They closed the place of the young man´s death during the commemorative event. That is why the site remained closed to a group of people who wanted to protest against the uproar following the Romany´s death.
"He was far from innocent, they [Romanies] must know that we will defend ourselves, we will not allow ourselves to be robbed and attacked easily. We have children and we are starting to fear letting them walk in the streets," a man from the group of critics told CTK.
Tension between the majority population and Romanies, whose number has been rising, has escalated in Tanvald, a town with 7,000 inhabitants, recently. Romanies have moved there from elsewhere in the Czech Republic and also from Slovakia. (via ČeskéNoviny.cz)

March commemorates young Romany shot dead in Czech town

About 200 people attended today´s funeral of a young Romany man who was shot dead in Tanvald a week ago, and a following march in his commemoration, which ended without any incidents in the afternoon.

After a requiem mass in the local church, accompanied by strong emotions, the crowd followed the coffin on its way to the Tanvald cemetery, from which most participants set off for the place where the 22-year-old man died to observe a minute of silence and lit candles.

Police officers, including an anti-conflict team, monitored the funeral’s course.

They closed the place of the young man´s death during the commemorative event. That is why the site remained closed to a group of people who wanted to protest against the uproar following the Romany´s death.

"He was far from innocent, they [Romanies] must know that we will defend ourselves, we will not allow ourselves to be robbed and attacked easily. We have children and we are starting to fear letting them walk in the streets," a man from the group of critics told CTK.

Tension between the majority population and Romanies, whose number has been rising, has escalated in Tanvald, a town with 7,000 inhabitants, recently. Romanies have moved there from elsewhere in the Czech Republic and also from Slovakia. (via ČeskéNoviny.cz)

December 20, 2011
Photo Alba Escayo

Photo Alba Escayo

(via aj-rromale)

December 16, 2011

Stop Gender inequality in Roma communities

Model the situation as it looks gender inequalities in marginalized Roma communities. The document consists of hexagonal scene, analysis expert on gender equality and slogans Roma celebrities.
produced by: Gipsy Television http://www.gipsytv.eu

(source: TheGipsyTV)

(via aj-rromale)

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